top of page

I've interviewed the illustrator 72 kilos!/Entrevista a 72 kilos!


Last week I interviewed 72 kilos. Wait, I’m going to repeat it to see if that makes it more real. Last week I interviewed 72 kilos. Well no, it’s still unbelievable to me! To be honest, I wouldn’t dare to call it an interview because I have no knowledge about journalism, so let’s say it was a conversation. It all started with my research for the Master’s Degree, through which I’m trying to find my artistic identity. And if we talk about a defined and recognizable artistic style, one of the first people who came to my mind was 72 kilos. Quick round of presentations. For those of you who don’t know me, I’m Eider, I play the violin and I’m studying a Classical Music Master’s Degree in ArtEZ Conservatorium (Zwolle, The Netherlands). For those of you who don’t know 72 kilos, he’s a Spanish illustrator who mainly draws tiny people who think and talk about topics that we sometimes struggle to talk and think about. Since a picture is worth more than a thousand words, the best thing you can do is to check his instagram.


It could be said that during some months I “analyzed” the work of 72 kilos and watched interviews in which he was asked mostly about issues related with social media and his success. But the artist within me couldn’t stop asking herself questions that were closer to my field: I was curious about his style, the evolution of his illustrations, if he has thought about new projects and how to approach them…

Your emotions/Your emotions with music (by 72 kilos)

I had already contacted Óscar Alonso (aka 72 kilos) last year, when I sent him an email to tell him how much I like his work, how much he transmits and helps me. So this time I emailed him again, but briefly explaining him about what I am researching and if he’d like to share his experience with me. After several emails, we arranged a video call and I must admit that I was more nervous than I expected. It’s the first time that I’ve spoken to someone I admire and follow for a long time to ask him about his oeuvre, and it's been a wonderful experience.


While I was reading the transcript of the interview the other day and I marked interesting or inspiring phrases I realized that there were almost more underlined sentences than un-underlined ones. It’s also been the first time that I’ve ever talked strictly about art with someone who’s not a musician, and I noticed that it’s something very enriching. Almost all of what he said can be translated to the music world, and sometimes looking at it from a different perspective gives you new ideas that open your mind and present possibilities that you hadn’t considered before. After all, art is art.


I have to say that, when it came to writing the questions I wanted to ask to Óscar, it was a bit hard for me to “shut down” the follower and fan Eider and listen only to the artist Eider who’s researching about her artistic identity. I’d have loved to ask him about his favorite illustration so far, about what he feels when he has an idea that he thinks is truly good, how he knows that an illustration is finished…


I’ve decided not to publish the interview itself, but I’d like to share certain things that I believe can be helpful for other artists or anyone interested. I want to start with what I find to be one of the most important lessons from what I talked with Óscar: the freedom to express oneself without the pressure of having to obtain a perfect result. “Yo solo quiero venir aquí, ponerme delante de un cuaderno y decir ‘bueno, a ver qué sale hoy’.” (I just want to come here, stand in front of a notebook and say ‘well, let’s see what comes out today’). Without the pressure of having to please the public or his followers, just drawing for the sake of drawing. Lately I’m realizing how necessary it is for me to be proud of what I do and trust all the effort and hard work I’ve put into it and how much I’ve learnt from the process. The fear and the insecurities that until now predominated in my body when I went on stage are giving way to an Eider who is more and more eager to eat the world and enjoy herself. Almost like maths, the more you understand them the more you like them (or at least so they say), but even better, because in our case we are lucky to have made our passion our profession.


Another thing I loved was the answer Óscar gave me when I asked him how he would define 72 kilos. After thinking about it for a few seconds, he said that, taking as a reference his first and last illustration, he’d say 72 kilos is a walk, a journey. A stroll that aims to “ir hacia delante, pasarlo bien y ver lo que hay” (to go forward, have fun and see what you find). At the end of the day, he translates his experiences and feelings, as well as those of people close to him, into his illustrations. The way I see it, he looks at his everyday life from a very artistic and creative point of view, to the point that (almost) anything can become art. I believe that Óscar wears some glasses that we all should put on more often (well, he actually wears glasses, but I don’t mean it literally). In fact, being one of my goals to transmit my feelings and life story through my music, Óscar is a big inspiration when it comes to this.

Your desires/Your fears/Your dreams/Your wings (by 72 kilos)

His illustrations have evolved a lot since he started, so the next thing I asked him was if he sees himself reflected in all of them. I think this question comes from my difficulty to know that during my education I’ve grown and learnt and that in every moment I’ve given my best with the possibilities and tools I had. When I see videos of me playing of some years ago, my first thoughts are always “I could do it much better now” or “this is not good”. Instead of focusing on the positive and feeling proud of how much I‘ve learnt and improved, the self-demanding takes a bigger space. Related to this, Óscar said something that I thought was very real: “Me veo totalmente reflejado. Era yo con mis herramientas, con mi photoshop, escaneando con mi teléfono… (...) Estoy super orgulloso de todo ese viaje porque nadie más lo podría haber hecho por mí. Es lo que yo sé hacer y lo que voy aprendiendo, y me veo totalmente reflejado.” (I see myself totally reflected. It was me with my tools, with my photoshop, scanning with my phone… (...) I’m super proud of all that journey because nobody else could have done it for me. It’s what I know to do and what I’m learning, and I can totally see myself reflected). Probably one of those sentences that I should stick to my wall and read every day.


Another conclusion I draw is that for Óscar the most important thing is the message he wants to convey through his illustrations, and his main goal is that that message is clearly understood. “El contexto es importante pero creo que el texto es más” (The context is important but I think the text is even more important). The illustrations are the way he’s found to express himself, and he’s found a style that helps him accomplish his goal. This reminds me of the the actor, director, screenwriter and film producer Taika Waititi explains in his TEDx talk "The Art of Creativity":


“My job is to express myself and to share my ideas and my point of view. It happens to be that I’m using filmmaking right now, but throughout the years I’ve done lots of different things. (...) I wanted to do everything. I wanted to try every single thing. I come from a background where people said ‘no, you have to have one job and stick with it.’ Well, I don’t believe that, I think that in this day and age people have things that they want to express and you need to have a wide range of tools: filmmaking, painting, acting, poetry… all that stuff they’re all tools.”


Maybe for prioritizing the message, or simply for exploring and exploiting creativity, Óscar would like to do things that are completely different of what he’s doing now, as if it were a lab. And I believe that maybe because of that he encouraged me to do things that are artistically nourishing, without being afraid to try and be for what I like to do and what makes me feel better than other things: “Mantenernos felices creo que tiene más sentido” (I think it makes more sense to keep ourselves happy). Therefore, Óscar, if you read this, thanks for helping me “draw” a path full of detours. I believe that my walk is going to be a bit longer than I thought, but I’m pretty sure it’s going to take me to places I never imagined.


Are you interested in the topic of artistic identity? I've written an ebook about it, click the button below to buy it!

 

La semana pasada entrevisté a 72 kilos. Espera, voy a repetirlo a ver si así se hace más real. La semana pasada entrevisté a 72 kilos. Pues no, me sigue pareciendo increíble! Bueno, en realidad no me atrevería a llamarlo entrevista porque no tengo conocimientos de periodismo, más bien fue una conversación. Todo empezó a raíz de mi trabajo de investigación para el Máster, a través del cual estoy intentando encontrar mi identidad artística. Y si hablamos de un estilo artístico definido y reconocible, una de las primeras personas que me vino a la mente fue 72 kilos. Ronda rápida de presentaciones. Para aquellos que no me conozcan, soy Eider, soy violinista y estoy estudiando un Máster de Interpretación de Música Clásica en ArtEZ University of the Arts (Zwolle, Países Bajos). Para aquellos que no conozcan a 72 kilos, es un ilustrador español que principalmente dibuja personitas que piensan y hablan sobre temas de los que a veces nos cuesta hablar y pensar, pero como una imagen vale más que mil palabras, lo mejor es que lo veáis directamente en su instagram.


Digamos que durante unos meses estuve “analizando” el trabajo de 72 kilos y viendo entrevistas en las que le preguntaban mayormente sobre temas relacionados con su éxito y las redes sociales. Pero la artista en mí no podía dejar de hacerse preguntas mucho más enfocadas a mi ámbito: tenía curiosidad sobre su estilo, la evolución de sus viñetas, si ha pensado sobre nuevos proyectos y cómo enfocarlos…


Ilustración de 72 kilos: Tus emociones/Tus emociones con música
Ilustración de 72 kilos

Ya había contactado con Óscar Alonso (aka 72 kilos) el año pasado, cuando le envié un email para decirle lo mucho que me gustan, me transmiten y me ayudan sus viñetas. Así que esta vez volví a escribirle, pero explicándole brevemente sobre qué estoy investigando y si querría compartir conmigo su experiencia. Tras varios emails, concretamos una videollamada y he de decir que me puse más nerviosa de lo que pensaba. Es la primera vez que he hablado con alguien a quien sigo y admiro desde hace tiempo para poder hacerle preguntas sobre su obra, y ha sido una experiencia maravillosa.


El otro día mientras leía la transcripción de nuestra conversación y anotaba frases interesantes o inspiradoras me di cuenta de que casi había más frases subrayadas que sin subrayar. También ha sido la primera vez que he hablado estrictamente sobre arte con alguien que no es músico, y me doy cuenta de que es algo muy enriquecedor. Casi todo lo que me dijo se puede traducir al mundo de la música, y en ocasiones el mirarlo desde otro punto de vista ofrece nuevas perspectivas que abren mucho la mente y presentan posibilidades que no había valorado antes. Al fin y al cabo, el arte es arte.


He de admitir que, a la hora de redactar las preguntas que quería hacerle a Óscar, fue un poco difícil para mí “apagar” a la Eider seguidora y fan y escuchar solo a la Eider artista que está investigando sobre su identidad artística. Me habría encantado preguntarle sobre su viñeta favorita hasta ahora, sobre lo que siente cuando tiene una idea que cree que es realmente buena, sobre cómo sabe cuándo una viñeta está terminada…


He decidido no hacer pública la entrevista en sí, pero me gustaría compartir ciertas cosas que me parece que puede ser de ayuda para otros artistas o cualquier persona interesada. Quiero empezar con uno de los aprendizajes que más importantes me parece de lo que hablé con Óscar: la libertad de poder expresarse sin presión a tener que obtener un resultado perfecto. “Yo solo quiero venir aquí, ponerme delante de un cuaderno y decir ‘bueno, a ver qué sale hoy’.” Sin la presión de tener que complacer al público ni a sus seguidores, sencillamente dibujar por el simple hecho de dibujar. Últimamente me estoy dando cuenta de lo necesario que es para mí estar orgullosa de lo que hago y confiar en ello, saber todo el esfuerzo que me ha costado y lo mucho que he aprendido en el proceso. El miedo y las inseguridades que hasta ahora predominaban en mi cuerpo al salir al escenario están dejando lugar a una Eider que cada vez tiene más ganas de comerse el mundo y disfrutar. Casi como las matemáticas, que cuanto más las entiendes más te gustan (o eso dicen), pero mejor aún, porque en nuestro caso tenemos la suerte de haber hecho de nuestra pasión nuestra profesión.


Otra cosa que me encantó fue la respuesta de Óscar cuando le pregunté cómo definiría 72 kilos. Tras pensarlo unos segundos, me dijo que, tomando como referencia su primera y última viñeta, diría que 72 kilos es un paseo. Un paseo que tiene como objetivo “ir hacia delante, pasarlo bien y ver lo que hay”. Al fin y al cabo, traslada a sus viñetas sus vivencias y sentimientos, así como los de gente cercana a él. Tal y como lo veo yo, mira su día a día desde un punto de vista muy artístico y creativo, de forma que (casi) cualquier cosa puede convertirse en arte. Creo que Óscar lleva unas gafas que todos deberíamos ponernos más a menudo (bueno, es que lleva gafas, pero no me refiero literalmente). De hecho, siendo uno de mis objetivos el transmitir mis sentimientos y mi historia de vida a través de la música, Óscar es una gran inspiración en este aspecto.


Ilustración de 72 kilos: Tus ganas/Tus miedos/Tus sueños/Tus alas
Ilustración de 72 kilos

Sus viñetas han evolucionado mucho desde que empezó, así que lo siguiente que le pregunté fue si se ve reflejado en todas ellas. Creo que esta pregunta nace desde mi dificultad para saber que durante toda mi formación he ido creciendo y aprendiendo y que en cada momento he hecho lo mejor con las posibilidades y herramientas que tenía. Cuando veo vídeos míos tocando de hace unos años, mis primeros pensamientos son siempre del tipo “ahora lo podría hacer mucho mejor” o “esto no está bien”. Y en lugar de centrarme en lo positivo y sentirme orgullosa de lo mucho que he mejorado y aprendido, la autoexigencia ocupa un lugar más grande. Óscar me dijo algo que me pareció muy real en este sentido: “Me veo totalmente reflejado. Era yo con mis herramientas, con mi photoshop, escaneando con mi teléfono… (...) Estoy super orgulloso de todo ese viaje porque nadie más lo podría haber hecho por mí. Es lo que yo sé hacer y lo que voy aprendiendo, y me veo totalmente reflejado.” Probablemente sea una de esas frases que debería pegar en mi pared y leer cada día.


Otra conclusión que saco es que para Óscar lo más importante es el mensaje que quiere transmitir a través de sus viñetas, y su principal objetivo es que ese mensaje se entienda con claridad. “El contexto es importante pero creo que el texto es más.” Las ilustraciones son el medio que utiliza para ello, y ha encontrado un estilo que le ayuda a cumplir su objetivo. Esto me recuerda a lo que el actor, director, guionista y productor de cine neozelandés Taika Waititi comenta en su charla TEDx “The Art of Creativity” (El Arte de la Creatividad):


“My job is to express myself and to share my ideas and my point of view. It happens to be that I’m using filmmaking right now, but throughout the years I’ve done lots of different things. (...) I wanted to do everything. I wanted to try every single thing. I come from a background where people said ‘no, you have to have one job and stick with it.’ Well, I don’t believe that, I think that in this day and age people have things that they want to express and you need to have a wide range of tools: filmmaking, painting, acting, poetry… all that stuff they’re all tools.” (Mi trabajo es expresarme y compartir mis ideas y mi punto de vista. Da la casualidad de que ahora me dedico al cine, pero a lo largo de los años he hecho muchas cosas diferentes. (...) Quería hacerlo todo. Quería probarlo todo. Vengo de un ambiente en el que la gente decía ‘no, tienes que tener un trabajo y ceñirte a él’. Bueno, yo no creo eso, creo que en estos tiempos la gente tiene cosas que quiere expresar y hay que tener un amplio abanico de herramientas: cine, pintura, interpretación, poesía... todo eso son herramientas).


Tal vez por primar el mensaje, o simplemente por explorar y explotar la creatividad, a Óscar gustaría hacer cosas totalmente diferentes de lo que hace ahora, como si de un laboratorio se tratara. Y creo que un poco a raíz de esto me animó a hacer cosas que me nutran en lo artístico, que no tenga miedo de probar y apostar por lo que me gusta y me hace sentir mejor que otras cosas: “Mantenernos felices creo que tiene más sentido”. Así que Óscar, si lees esto, gracias por ayudarme a “dibujar” un camino lleno de desvíos. Creo que mi paseo va a ser más largo de lo que pensaba, pero estoy segura de que me llevará a lugares que ni imaginé.


¿Te interesa el tema de la identidad artística? Estoy escribiendo un ebook (en inglés) sobre ello, clica el botón para recibir una notificación cuando lo publique.



Recent Posts

See All

Comentarios


Do you like my posts? Then don't forget to subscribe to my newsletter!
And get my musical decalogue for free

Thanks for subscribing!

bottom of page